Are most of your runs slow?

Many runners are surprised to hear that your best results come when most of your training runs are recovery runs which are ‘easy’ and slow. That’s right! The majority of runners I see run too fast most of the time and this results in little to no gains in training and their performance plateaus or even declines. This often leads to frustration, injury and fatigue. Instead, run slower more often and you’ll race faster and have more fun. This sounds counter intuitive but let me explain why this method works so well for so many runners.

  1. Training and performance gains are all all about recovery. The quicker you recover from your workouts, the more progress you will make. Think of recovery runs as ‘active recovery’. Your next workout will go better when you are fully recovered thus maximizing performance gains.
  2. Slow, easy runs allow you to increase your volume and weekly mileage with less chances of injury, fatigue and burn out.
  3. Recovery runs enhance your race performance by preventing you from plateauing, over training or getting injured. Instead, you are more likely too see a steady increase in running performance by running easy and slow more often because you’ll be more consistent and enjoy running more.

So what is a ‘recovery’ run?

Slow and ‘easy’ is different for everyone. In general, you want your recovery run to be mostly flat and fairly short mileage (3-6 miles for most people). Determining your pace can be a bit more challenging and this is where a professional running coach can help.

To figure out your recovery run pace, here are some tips:

  1. If you use a heart rate monitor, shoot for 120-145 BPM.
  2. Run a pace where you could hold a conversation if you had to. You should not be breathing too hard. If you are, you are running too fast.
  3. Walking is encouraged if it helps you bring your heart rate to the desired range or your breathing is too labored.
  4. Shoot for 60-80% of your runs to be ‘easy’ recovery runs.
  5. Practice an efficient running technique to make your running easier.

Happy Running,

Coach Damian Stoy

www.WholisticRunning.com

 

Dinner Recipes for Athletes

Eating well makes you feel good, have more energy and recover quicker. Being consistent will help you run better and live a more energetic, happy life. Here are two recipes we love making this time of year. For more info on Nutritional Coaching, Lindsey is here to help you thrive.

roasted veggies

Lindsey’s Simple Roasted Vegetables

2-3 medium sweet potatoes, diced

2-3 medium beets, diced

1 sweet onion, diced

1 lb brussels sprouts, halved

1 medium head of cauliflower, cut into florets

1 lb fresh baby bella mushrooms, diced

3-5 cloves garlic, chopped

1 T coconut oil

We usually make two pans of this recipe because it goes quick and everyone always has seconds on this.

Preheat your oven to 360 and do your chopping while it’s heating. Then line a baking sheet (or 2) with parchment paper. Spread the cut up veggies evenly in both pans except for the mushrooms. Sprinkle with freshly ground sea salt and pepper to taste.

Add the coconut oil sparingly. Since it’s usually solid at room temperature, it works best to put small chunks in 4-5 places across the pan. Bake veggies for about 1 hour, but be sure and stir every 20 minutes. This will help to spread the coconut oil evenly over the vegetables and prevent anything from burning. At about 20 minutes remaining add the mushrooms.

The fun thing about this recipe is that you can add whatever vegetables you like best. These are some of our favorite. Not much spice is needed as all of these veggies take on a lot of flavor on their own when roasted.

yellow lentis

Damian’s Lentils

1 cup yellow lentils

3 cups water or veggie stock

1/2-1 T cumin (depends on how much spice you like)

1/2 T ground ginger

1 Dash cinnamon to taste

Sea salt and pepper to taste

Cook on a stovetop, using 3 cups of liquid (water, stock or combo) to 1 cup of dry lentils. Be sure to use a large enough saucepan as the lentils will double or triple in size. Bring to a boil, cover tightly, reduce heat and simmer until they are tender. For whole lentils, cook time is typically 15-20 minutes.

When finished cooking, add spices. Be sure NOT to add sea salt until after lentils are finished cooking as the lentils will remain hard if you do so. You can leave these a bit chunky or blend until smooth and creamy. If you like them on the creamy side you can also add a touch of soy or almond milk.

Happy Running,

Lindsey & Damian

www.WholisticRunning.com